Societies View of Womens Sex Toys Over Time

Sex toys for women have made an about-face in the last two decades. From being branded as ‘things you don’t talk about” to an accepted part of sexual play, the journey of vibrators and other pleasure aids is a fascinating story of self-discovery.

Everyone knows that while women attained voting status in 1920, but their progress for full equality has been long and difficult, with the Feminist Movement of the 1960’s -1980’s meeting such resistance and backlash from society, the needs of women; especially when it came to sexual fulfillment, went publically unaddressed for decades. It wasn’t until the third wave of the women’s liberation; the wave that began in the 1990’s, that some of the concepts behind what liberation truly meant; especially when it came to sexual equality and gratification, finally began to sink in. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the increased use and acceptance of sex toys for women. Strangely enough, while sex toys have only recently become an accepted addition to the average person’s bedroom entertainment, this was not always the case.

A Short History of Sex Toys
Objects we would recognize as sex toys; specifically dildos, can be found as far back as ancient Greece and Egypt and plenty of documentation to prove that they were not used for representation or ‘religious purposes’ but were indeed designed to be put to practical use. The Romans followed suit and became notorious for their sexual orgies. With the introduction of Christianity (specifically the Catholic Church) into society, the use (or acknowledged use) of sex toys became a taboo subject for centuries, but re-emerged in (of all times!) the Victorian era.

It was during the Victorian era that the forerunner to the modern day vibrator was invented and prescribed by doctors to alleviate women’s “hysteria” which was believed to be caused by uterine imbalances which the vibrator would ‘balance.’ In fact, by the early 20th century vibrators were being sold in stores (specifically in the 1918 Sears and Roebuck Catalog) as medical devices that would enhance marital satisfaction.

While it seemed that sex toys were about to become societal acceptable, a sexual blackout occurred following WWII where no longer was it acceptable to talk about sexual issues. It was a blackout that would extend into the 1960’s when free love finally knocked the verbal repression on its ear. But sexual toys were still not societal acceptable, especially for women; especially for nice women.

It took the women’s liberation movement to bring an acceptance of women’s sexual needs and appetites into mainstream society, and today we are finally beginning to see the results of these movements on our society.

Sexual Toys Today
No matter what your preference, sex toys are now readily available for both men and women. From very basic vibrators and butt plugs to more sophisticated items, you will find anything you can imagine to be readily available, in any color as well as a variety of materials and (this is the great bit!) accepted by society not as something you don’t discuss, but as a healthy part of sexual intimacy.